fireandlunch:

In this week’s Piecast we run a tad long because FireandLunch needed a bit of a therapy session. We’ll call it “rage cast”. We talk what we’re reading, Queen Shireen, the tragedy of Strong Belwas and Cannibal Thenns. And yes, we also talk about “That Scene”.

Remember the Piecast is a NOT a spoiler free podcast.

Enjoy!

#Piecast; Episode 3: Breaker of Chains. Featuring Rachel, Jenny, Lauren, Katie and Jess. (Megan is away.) Running time ~ 1 hour.

ICYMI

In this week’s Piecast we run a tad long because FireandLunch needed a bit of a therapy session. We’ll call it “rage cast”. We talk what we’re reading, Queen Shireen, the tragedy of Strong Belwas and Cannibal Thenns. And yes, we also talk about “That Scene”.

Remember the Piecast is a NOT a spoiler free podcast.

Enjoy!

#Piecast; Episode 3: Breaker of Chains. Featuring Rachel, Jenny, Lauren, Katie and Jess. (Megan is away.) Running time ~ 1 hour.

kitachka:

Lol

it has been improved

(via starshipcalledserenity)

Hello!

I see we have some new followers recently and want to welcome you. Thanks for following us!

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Welcome to the madness.

By the way, if any of you created these magnificent gifs, step forward so we can credit you! 

I think the “butterfly effect” that I have spoken of so often was at work here. In the novels, Jaime is not present at Joffrey’s death, and indeed, Cersei has been fearful that he is dead himself, that she has lost both the son and the father/ lover/ brother. And then suddenly Jaime is there before her. Maimed and changed, but Jaime nonetheless. Though the time and place is wildly inappropriate and Cersei is fearful of discovery, she is as hungry for him as he is for her.
The whole dynamic is different in the show, where Jaime has been back for weeks at the least, maybe longer, and he and Cersei have been in each other’s company on numerous occasions, often quarreling. The setting is the same, but neither character is in the same place as in the books, which may be why Dan & David played the sept out differently. But that’s just my surmise; we never discussed this scene, to the best of my recollection.
Also, I was writing the scene from Jaime’s POV, so the reader is inside his head, hearing his thoughts. On the TV show, the camera is necessarily external. You don’t know what anyone is thinking or feeling, just what they are saying and doing.
If the show had retained some of Cersei’s dialogue from the books, it might have left a somewhat different impression — but that dialogue was very much shaped by the circumstances of the books, delivered by a woman who is seeing her lover again for the first time after a long while apart during which she feared he was dead. I am not sure it would have worked with the new timeline.
That’s really all I can say on this issue. The scene was always intended to be disturbing… but I do regret if it has disturbed people for the wrong reasons.
— George R.R. Martin responds to fan’s concern over Jaime and Cersei’s scene in “Breaker of Chains” x (via cotilardmarion)

(via swordinthedarkness)

< insert smile with flash of gold tooth >

(via swordinthedarkness)

So the question is not, exactly, “Why change the books?” Because the answer is clear: Many, many details must be changed, just to make the transition from book series to televised series work. The question is, instead: “Why change this?” Why make a scene from the book that depicts consensual sex into one in the show that depicts rape?

Rape of Thrones · For Our Consideration · The A.V. Club

Thank god for the A.V. Club, the only media outlet that has outright called bullshit on this so far.

And another really important quote:

Rape is a tricky thing to use as character development, for either the victim or the rapist; doing it twice raises a lot of red flags. It assumes that rape between characters doesn’t fundamentally change the rest of their story—and it assumes that the difference between consent and rape is, to use the parlance, a “blurred line.”

(via mythandrists)

(via greencarnations)

tyrionsthrone:

Daario’s Guide On How To Impress the Woman You Love:

Kill someone for her

(via swordinthedarkness)

gameoflulz:

Game of Thrones S04E03

(via bravedannyflint)

asker

destieltheory asked: Hey, this might be a stupid question, so apologies in advance. I recently saw your post about "can everyone find the word yes". I've read the book and am familiar with the show, but who is D&D? Additionally, the person who reblogged it tagged it as "rape cw". Can you guys say a little more about that? Thanks!

David Benioff and Dan “DB” Weiss, the writers, producers, and creators of game of thrones. (they are the credited writers for Breaker of Chains so we’re gonna give them full credit for this writing choice)

People tag things “tw”, which stands for trigger warning, or ‘cw” content warning - when a post contains sensitive and/or triggering content that can be harmful to some readers.

I hope that helps.